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Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have found that the diabetic drug, pramlintide, reduces amyloid-beta peptides, a major component of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in the brain and improves learning. continue reading

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Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have clarified three fundamental issues about Alzheimer’s: where it starts, why it starts there, and how it spreads. continue reading

Alzheimer's disease starts in the entorhinal cortex - yellow

Alzheimer’s disease starts in the entorhinal cortex (yellow). Using Functional Magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of mouse and human brains, researchers provide evidence that the disease spreads from the entorhinal cortex (yellow) to other cortical regions (red) — the perirhinal cortex and posterior parietal cortex. Credit: Usman Khan/lab of Scott A. Small, MD, Columbia University Medical Center.

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For years, Alzheimer’s researchers have focused on two proteins that accumulate in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s and may contribute to the disease: plaques made up of the protein amyloid-beta, and tangles of another protein, called tau.continue reading 

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Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a new set of genetic markers for Alzheimer’s that point to a second pathway through which the disease develops.  The scientists identified several genes linked to the , which is found in the  that develop in the brain as Alzheimer’s progresses and patients develop dementia.  continue reading . Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have discovered a way to potentially halt the progression of dementia caused by accumulation of a protein known as tau. continue reading

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Related Stories

Brain network decay detected in early Alzheimer’s
Aug 19, 2013

In patients with early Alzheimer’s disease, disruptions in brain networks emerge about the same time as chemical markers of the disease appear in the spinal fluid, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in …

Living at home with dementia
Dec 19, 2013 

Most people with dementia who live at home have multiple unmet health and welfare needs, any number of which could jeopardize their ability to remain home for as long as they desire, new Johns Hopkins research suggests.

A European team of experts led by The University of Manchester will explore, investigate and evaluate the role of the neighborhood in the everyday lives of people with dementia and their families in a new research project …

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Thanks for visiting with me.

 Eric

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See also:

Meditation Changes Brains!
Health breakthroughs – hyperthermia
Healthy spirituality and its biology
Mind health
Screens will hurt your children
practicing simply: mindfulness

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